HISTORY OF THE TROPICAL COAST

Published by M.M.M on

HISTORY OF THE TROPICAL COAST

The Costa Granadina or Costa Tropical is a Spanish region located at the southern end of the province of Granada. This territory limits to the east with the region of Poniente Almeriense, in Almería; to the west with the Axarquia - Costa del Sol, in Malaga; to the north with Alhama, the Lecrín Valley and the Alpujarra Granadina; and to the south it has access to the Mediterranean Sea.

It is made up of eighteen municipalities, of which the largest and most populous is Motril; on the contrary, the municipality with the smallest number of inhabitants is Lentegí, and the one with the smallest area is Torrenueva Costa. Its traditional and historical capital is the city of Motril.

de Motril.

This region corresponds to the one limited by the province since the 18th century facing the Alboran Sea, which until then was called the Sea of ​​Granada. In this territory are the seaports of greatest historical importance to communicate the Kingdom of Granada with North Africa, such as Almuñécar, the former Sexi of Phoenician origin, before the Nasrid kingdom, dependent on the Taifa of Elvira. The most significant historical remains are those of the Roman salting industry, the Roman aqueduct over the Jete Valley and numerous watchtowers and watchtowers that line the coast, as well as small fortresses such as Salobreña and Almuñécar.

It is a relatively steep coast due to the proximity of the mountains of the Betic System, which form cliffs but also alternate coves and beaches, mainly rocky. There are five tourist centers on the Granada Coast: Almuñécar, Salobreña, Motril, Castell de Ferro and La Rábita. They are all equipped with good tourist infrastructures and are ideal for practicing numerous sports such as: windsurfing, diving, sailing, water skiing, golf, tennis, squash or horse riding.

Categories: Tourism

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